Derelict chapel turned into luxury home near Hampton Court

2 months ago kakp2 Comments Off on Derelict chapel turned into luxury home near Hampton Court

A derelict chapel that has been transformed into a heavenly home has gone on the market for £1.8m.

When Keith Holmes, 73, bought the property in 1997 it was a complete wreck with missing tiles, woodworm and smashed stained glass windows.

He had to completely gut the building before he could turn it into a stunning house and his labour of love took 16 years and about £800,000.

Mr Holmes, an art restorer and painter, only finished his epic renovation four years ago but has decided to sell so he can start a new project.

The humble exterior of this former chapel near Hampton Court in London gives no clue of what lies inside. Keith Holmes, 73, bought the property in 1997 when it was a complete wreck with missing tiles, woodworm and smashed stained glass windows. It has now been transformed and is on the market for £1.8million

The stunning property now boasts a library room and there is a nod to its holy past. There is a Latin inscription around the edge of the mezzanine floor which translates to ‘this house has been rendered more beautiful by the presence of a dove’

Mr Holmes, an art restorer and painter, only finished his epic renovation four years ago but has decided to sell so he can start a new project. The three-bedroom house in East Molesey, Surrey, dates back to 1886. It was built due to demand for a non-Catholic place of worship

Derelict: When the property was bought in 1997 it was a complete wreck with missing tiles, woodworm and smashed stained glass windows. Mr Holmes had to completely gut the building before he could turn it into a stunning house

This property is now on the market with Knight Frank.

The three-bedroom house in East Molesey, Surrey, dates back to 1886. It was built due to demand for a non-Catholic place of worship but mistakes were made.

The scale of the church was too ambitious for the size of the congregation which meant they could not afford the debt repayment and it was at the wrong end of the village so membership did not increase.

It was sold just a decade after being built to boat builder Harry Tagg for £1,000.

Harry was a member of a well-known family of local watermen, he founded Thames Hotel by Hampton Court bridge and his brother Thomas is who Taggs Island is named after.

Part of the building was used as a boat repair shop up until the 1930s. The house is now split over two floors with an open-plan feel, working the original chapel fittings into the design, keeping the vaulted ceilings and original beams

The main bedroom, a bathroom and the second bedroom or garden room are in the front section of the house and can be accessed by a staircase in the entrance hall. The bedroom is spacious with a large window to allow a lot of light in

The scale of the church was too ambitious for the size of the congregation which meant they could not afford the debt repayment and it was at the wrong end of the village so membership did not increase. It fell into a state of disrepair until it was bought in 1997

Keith Holmes bought the derelict chapel and transformed it into a luxury home and it has gone on the market for £1.8m. As recently as 1997 the stunning property was a complete wreck with missing tiles, woodworm and smashed stained glass windows

At the time Harry Tagg owned this property the River Mole flowed alongside it. Part of this building was used as a boat repair shop up until the 1930s when the river was diverted and this bit was filled in to create Creek Road.

The house is now split over two floors with an open-plan feel, working the original chapel fittings into the design, keeping the vaulted ceilings and original beams.

There is also a Latin inscription around the edge of the mezzanine floor which translates to ‘this house has been rendered more beautiful by the presence of a dove’ – a nod to the building’s godly past but also to the expert builder who helped Mr Holmes transform the house, Chris Dove.

The house has 5,113 sq ft. On the ground floor the two buildings have been joined together with an entrance hall leading into a gallery/reception room, a studio or another reception room, the beautiful library room and a study or third bedroom.

Upstairs the former chapel is separated from the front building by a 950 sq ft roof terrace. The main bedroom, a bathroom and the second bedroom or garden room are in the front section and can be accessed by a staircase in the entrance hall.

The open-plan dining room, kitchen and family area are across the roof terrace in the grander chapel section with the original beams. From here a staircase takes people down to the ground floor library, which has been partially opened up to enjoy the vaulted ceiling.

The open-plan dining room, kitchen and family area are across the roof terrace in the grander chapel section with the original beams. From here a staircase takes people down to the ground floor library, which has been partially opened up to enjoy the vaulted ceiling

Upstairs the former chapel is separated from the front building by a 950 sq ft roof terrace. The main bedroom, a bathroom and the second bedroom or garden room are in the front section and can be accessed by a staircase in the entrance hall

Mr Holmes had to completely gut the building before he could turn it into a stunning house and his labour of love took 16 years and about £800,000 to complete

The developer has worked to fit the original chapel fittings into the design, keeping the vaulted ceilings and original beams. Mr Holmes estimates only about 10 per cent of the stained glass windows were in tact when he bought the property

The house is near Hampton Court mainline station and within easy walk from the popular Bridge Road area and River Thames.

Mr Holmes said: ‘When I bought it in 1997 it was a complete wreck – it had roof tiles missing and a lot of the wood was worm-eaten and crumbling.

‘There was also a lot of debris from when it was used as a sort of antique store place and there was only about ten per cent of the stained glass windows that was intact.

‘But I could see it had potential, I was looking for a big open space where I could have a studio as well.

‘There were lots of elements that could be saved even though it was a complete mess.

‘I had some technical experience myself but I also found an excellent builder, a real craftsman that could turn his hand to anything.

‘I kept telling him because of his skills he had to make a mark like the old stonemasons did but he wouldn’t so I commissioned the Latin saying instead.’

A spokesman for Knight Frank said: ‘With the feel of a New York loft rather than a standard house, the property is perfect for someone who loves open plan living with all accommodation boxes ticked.’

The luxurious bathroom is at the front of the house and can be accessed using a staircase in the entrance hall. It has a bath set into the floor as well as a shower and a towel heater

Mr Holmes said: Mr Holmes said: ‘When I bought it in 1997 it was a complete wreck – it had roof tiles missing and a lot of the wood was worm-eaten and crumbling. ‘There was also a lot of debris from when it was used as a sort of antique store place’
The house is near Hampton Court mainline station and within easy walk from the popular Bridge Road area and River Thames. A spokesman for estate agent Knight Frank said: ‘With the feel of a New York loft rather than a standard house, the property is perfect for someone who loves open plan living with all accommodation boxes ticked’